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Your guide to kitchen renovation or remodeling. Kitchen renovating, restoring and restoration.  Your kitchen like new again.

Kitchen Renovation Project

Below is an example of a kitchen that has been renovated. Rather than replacing the whole kitchen, the owners decided to replace some doors, panels and the extractor canopy.  The doors and panels were lacquered for a new-looking appearance.  The old built-in extractor was removed and replaced with and a new canopy rangehood.

Before

Kitchen renovation project before

After

Kitchen renovation project image after

Kitchen Renovation Photographs courtesy of Kitchen & Furniture Paintshop, Tauranga

 

 

 

 

How is kitchen renovation done?

Kitchen renovation or remodeling is the process of using as much of the old kitchen as possible whilst bringing it back up to a new-looking appearance.  It’s often possible to modernise it at the same time to give it an up-to-the minute look.

Solid Timber Kitchen Doors

  • Surface dirt, lacquer, paint or varnish must first be completely removed. Wood filler is applied to minor imperfections; scratches and chips are sanded back and filled.
  • When a perfectly cleaned and filled surface has been sanded back, the doors will receive its first coat of lacquer. This might be clear, to obtain a natural wood finish or a wood primer if the doors are to be coloured. This first coat will be sanded back and will act to further fill any minor imperfections. More coats will follow, undercoat and topcoat for colour.
  • During colder months or during damp weather, the doors may need to be hardened off with heat.

Previously Lacquered Kitchen Doors

  • Surface dirt, lacquer, paint or varnish must first be completely removed. Wood filler is applied to minor imperfections; scratches and chips are sanded back and filled.
  • Depending on the condition of the old lacquer, the doors might need to be patch-primed after being sanded back.
  • When a perfectly cleaned and filled surface has been sanded back and patch-primed, the doors will receive at least one undercoat, with sanding between coats. This will be in an appropriate colour for the finish coat and is critical to the final appearance of the doors. The quality of the finish is dependent on the quality of preparation.

Melamine Kitchen Doors

Many people have older kitchens with durable melamine doors (such as Melteca), which are in good physical condition but an out-of-date colour. These doors have PVC edge tape, usually 2mm thick, to protect the edges.

The obvious thing to do with outdated doors is to simply replace them with a modern colour. However, not only can it be cheaper, but it can look a lot better to have them painted. When properly done, melamine doors can be brought up to a very good finish indeed with two-pot lacquer.

Those who sell melamine and thermoformed kitchen doors are likely to tell you that painting melamine doors is ill-advised. They will encourage you to buy their products at a higher price than paint finishing by telling you horror stories about paint rubbing off. If the attributes and available colours of these systems suit you it might be the way to go. But if you like the idea of lacquered doors then do not be put off. Properly done, the two-pot lacquer system can give you an outstanding finish and provide a remarkable transformation for your tired old kitchen.

However, there is a very big but. It has to be done properly or the lacquer is liable to chip or wear badly on the edges. The secret to a durable finish is, as ever, in the preparation.

The PVC edge of a melamine door has to be treated with a special plastic primer before the door is undercoated. A simple enough thing you might think but do not assume that your local paint shop knows this. Do your homework before entrusting this work to anybody.

What About the DIY Option

Certainly the cheapest option by far and the competent handyperson might make a decent job of kitchen renovation. But although it might be cheaper in the first place, think about the long term cost. Your kitchen will make of break the sale of your house. A poorly executed paint job is not likely to tip the balance in favour of a sale.

DIY kitchen painting tips                kitchen remodeling                 kitchen renovation

 

 

 

 

 

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